Colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CACC) is one of the most serious complications of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), particularly in ulcerative colitis (UC); it accounts for approximately 15% of all-causes mortality among IBD patients. Because CACC shows a worse prognosis and higher mortality than sporadic colorectal cancer, early detection is critical. Colonoscopy is primarily recommended for surveillance and several advanced endoscopic imaging techniques are emerging. In addition, recent studies have reported on attempts to develop clinically relevant biomarkers for surveillance using various biosamples, which may become high-performance screening tools in the future, so the best approach and technique for cancer surveillance in long-standing UC patients remain under debate. This review gives a comprehensive description and summary about what progress has been made in terms of early CACC detection.

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