Background

Infliximab (IFX) is the first-line treatment for patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and is noted for its relatively high cost. The therapeutic efficacy of IFX has noticeable individual differences. Known single-gene polymorphisms (SNPs) are inadequate for predicting non-response to IFX. In this study, we aimed to identify new genetic factors associated with IFX-therapy failure and to predict non-response to IFX by developing a multivariate predictive model.

Methods

In this retrospective study, we collected and analysed the data of Chinese patients with CD who received IFX therapy at one hospital between June 2013 and June 2019. Primary non-response (PNR) and non-durable response (NDR) were evaluated using a simple endoscopic score for CD (SES-CD). A total of 125 SNPs within 44 genes were genotyped. A multivariate logistic-regression model was established to predict non-response to IFX. An area-under-the-receiver-operating-characteristics curve (AUROC) was applied to evaluate the predictive model performance.

Results

Forty-two of 206 (20.4%) patients experienced PNR and 15 of 159 (9.4%) patients experienced NDR. Nine SNPs were associated with PNR (P < 0.05). A PNR predictive model was established, incorporating 2-week high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), rs61886887, rs61740234, rs357291, rs2269330, and rs111504845, and the AUROC on training and testing data sets were 0.818 (P < 0.001) and 0.888 (P < 0.001), respectively. At week 14, hs-CRP levels ≥ 2.25 mg/L were significantly associated with NDR (AUROC = 0.815, P < 0.001). PNR-associated SNPs were not mutually associated with NDR, suggesting distinct mechanisms between PNR and NDR.

Conclusion

Genetic polymorphisms are significantly associated with response to IFX among Chinese CD patients.

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